When Death Doesn't Mean Goodbye (Viewed 56 times)
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Re: When Death Doesn't Mean Goodbye
Reply #1 Posted on December 07, 2017

Another amazing cultural stratagem of human society's attempt to deny death. It is a beautiful display of the character of the human spirit of survival beyond death.

 

It is very remarkable that spanning over centuries, this custom would allow one could to return and help redress one's old carcass, and even smell oneself in the past life(s).

 

Why bother reincarnating when you can just hang around on a bamboo stick (pun intended). They never have the anxiety of missing that last chance to say "I love you" to the ones they care about.

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Posts: 156
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Re: When Death Doesn't Mean Goodbye
Reply #2 Posted on December 07, 2017
Thanks for the reply, Surya. True...why bother reincarnating when you When I came across the article, I was taken aback by this Indonesian tradition where they were so attached to their family member's deceased body.
There may be some truth I think what you say in the last paragraph.
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Re: When Death Doesn't Mean Goodbye
Reply #3 Posted on December 07, 2017
Horrors, but it is the reality for those persons regarding the mystery of death of a physical form.

Thanks for posting!

Informative!
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Re: When Death Doesn't Mean Goodbye
Reply #4 Posted on December 10, 2017

There are documentaries that include parts where animals such as apes and elephants not only morn their loved ones, but display difficulty saying goodbye to the dead body of a clan member. Attachment to life as we know it, or resistance to full-time dimensional displacement is endemic and inherent to all sentient beings, our very life force commandeers these behaviors for survival.

 

All societies cultivated some type of masquerade that has evolved from a desire to shield from the face of death. We here in the US are familiar with a negation of death by for example dressing up the body and applying make-up on it, in order to pretend to one last show on this side.

 

Currently, from the same psychological disposition science is being used in order to provide an answer to this desire when we look at cryogenic. Many have invested a dizzying amount of money to preserve their body and hopefully upload their memories in order to be resuscitated in the future.

 

Long before the expiration of the person, in terminal stages or 6 months as predicted to die, they are confined in hospices where the rest of society is shielded from their predicaments. The denial takes on different forms from extremes of overt to covert behaviors.

 

I am soon completing an extensive process of recruitment to volunteer as a death doula and to become at this time more specifically and death vigil or an 11th-hour specialist. This, I consider will be helpful to me as a means of understanding an essential part of the human experience.

 

The dying process is relevant to a personal and internal process, but culturally a familiarity can assist in better evaluating an event that ultimately baffles most if not all living entities. So becoming a death doula is my way of expressing my own consternation before the phenomena.  

 

Already it is visible that it is the unseen mento-emotional attachments that must be understood and sorted out. At any rate, avoiding bewilderment in this respect will be quite a feat to accomplish, because it relates to both one’s own sense of belonging to a clan as well as the incarnates’ desire to hold on for participatory obligations in their group’s survival enterprise.   

 

Much progress has been accomplished in terms of offering alternatives to alienating death in the hospital setting and expanding hospice and at home dying, including acknowledgment of the right of the dying persons’ rights and desires. Still, more advancement could come from additional “realistic” insight into the internal process of the expiring individuals, hopefully aside from doctrines, dogmas and even rational nihilism.

 

These different elements would eventually bring about some more realism in the care for the dying all the way into the disposal or preservation of the used bodies. All things considered, this is a definite hair-splitting and bone drying affair.